Touristy but not a tourist

On Sunday we took an opportunity to have a guided tour around the Naval college. Not normally one for tours, this was a little different as it was a personal tour with the lecturer of a course Robbie’s taking, so was a nice ramble at our own pace. We got to learn a bit more about the architecture, royal lineage, art, hospital antics and enjoyed a game of skittles (in the mortuary). To add to the scene, there was an Aston Martin rally (though a little phantom apparently says the correct phrase is Concours d’Etat), lined up along the main thoroughfare and around the lawns.

Having lived in Greenwich for two and a half years, it was something we should have done sooner and would recommend to visitors, now we just have to make time for the Cutty Sark, Queens House, Planetarium, Brewery…the list goes on.

I also visited an Open Day at secondfloor.co.uk, a collective of craft studios situated in an industrial estate in Woolwich by the Thames. I spent a pleasant couple of hours looking around some of the open studios before wandering home in what turned out to be a rather more pleasant day than the weather forecast (which was a shame for the Black Caps, who seemed to have the upper hand when we left Lords at the end of play on Saturday).

Etiquette

Today we spent the day at Lords, amused by the members unspoken communication based on the choice of MCC attire; a blazer, hat, tie or cricket jumper to keep away the cold May wind. While Lords may be on the more traditional side of etiqutte, waiting for the over to complete and members only areas, etiquette is very much present in every day life. Be it the Londoner scowling at the tourist who stands on the left hand side of the escalator, or the person in the coffee queue who doesn’t quite pay enough attention to the peculiarities of that particular barrista while waiting for your coffee to be served. In busy lives, these day to day pleasantries, which seem trivial to those who are not part of the day to day rut, are surprisingly the things that seen to make the difference between an easy day and one that is slightly more stressful in our somewhat frantic modern lives.